Articles

Are sociospatial differences cast in concrete?

Research results on segregation in the Helsinki metropolitan area indicate quite significant differences between sub-city areas in terms of income and education levels, percentages of immigrant population and employment rates (e.g. Vaattovaara & Kortteinen 2012; Vilkama 2012; Lönnqvist & Tuominen 2013). Although the general increase in education and income levels is evident across almost all areas, the differences have remained the same – or even increased – over the past decade (Vilkama et al. 2014). The increase in area differences has always been seen as a negative phenomenon, and various political measures have been taken to curb or reverse it. On the other hand, it would seem that social segregation is a fairly common and often permanent urban phenomenon.

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Lower-income young in-migrants - a risk to Helsinki's tax base?

As with other urban centres, it has been typical for Helsinki that the people moving into the city are young people with relatively low income, while those moving out are older and have often established themselves in employment. This has been seen as a threat for the city's tax revenue. But is the reality more complex?

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Quarterly 4/2014 |  02/06/2015Senja Svahn

Harnessing the uncovered opportunities of open data

Open data should be approached and analysed from the perspective of its benefits. It holds many still uncovered opportunities which could be identified and better utilised.

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Quarterly 4/2014 |  02/06/2015Pekka Vuori

Development of the elderly population in Helsinki

Currently almost 100,000 people aged over 65 live in Helsinki, equivalent to 16 per cent of the city’s population. This figure is expected to reach 20 per cent by 2032. The population of Helsinki is ageing rapidly but not as fast as the entire Finnish population.

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Article |  02/06/2015Vesa Keskinen

Citizens prefer collectively produced urban culture

Neighbourhood festivals, block parties, Restaurant Day, Cleaning Day – all these are examples of new, innovative and collective urban culture. Informal events arranged by citizens and communities have been extremely popular. This article examines how collective urban culture manifests itself in the consumption of culture and cultural activities in Helsinki.

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How Helsinki became a trailblazer in urban culture

From consumption to co-production; from large-scale to small-scale; from café culture to street food; from 'looking up to Berlin' to leading the way? During the past couple of decades, urban culture in Helsinki has developed on an unprecedented scale.

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